Financial Assistance for DACA Recipients Amid the COVID-19 Crisis

Table of Contents

    Implemented in 2012, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program (DACA) has given approximately 800,000 people legal work status and temporary protection for deportation. In 2017, the Trump administration announced plans to end DACA, effectively endangering the status of DACA recipients, or “Dreamers.” Combined with fee increases and mounting proposals in the Supreme Court, DACA recipients are left with a significant amount of emotional and financial stress. In fact, the U.S. has around 1.2 million people who are eligible for DACA, though some have not applied because they either can’t afford the fees or are afraid to draw attention to themselves.

    One of the main sources of stress for DACA recipients stemmed from statements made by President Donald Trump regarding the DACA program in September 2017. At that time, Trump’s administration threatened to end the DACA program, declaring that no one new would be protected under the program. The administration also stated at the time that those who were covered would lose their protection and work permits starting as early as March 6, 2018.

    The administration tried to push forward with the changes, but ran into roadblocks on June 18, 2020, when the Supreme Court ruled in favor of DACA recipients and restored the 2012 Obama Administration DACA policy.

    This ruling should reopen DACA for new applicants, reopen “advance parole,” and allow current DACA recipients to continue to renew their status, though there is no timeline for when new applications will open for first-time applicants. There is also no clear timeline for applying for advance parole, which, prior to Trump’s changes, allowed DACA recipients to leave the country for educational, employment and humanitarian reasons.

    While the Supreme Court ruling was a major win for DACA (and DACA recipients across the nation), the fight is unfortunately not over. Trump can still attempt to repeal the ruling for a second time, which is why it’s crucial for DACA recipients to renew their protections as soon as possible.

    And there’s another issue. While major improvements are happening to reinstate DACA, DACA recipients now face a new challenge, too: the COVID-19 pandemic. The $2 trillion stimulus bill that was passed leaves out immigrant families. To receive the stimulus check, everyone living in the home must have a social security number. If anyone in the home files with an individual tax identification number (ITIN), the family will not qualify for the assistance. Unlike other residents of the United States, DACA recipients will receive little financial help from the United States government, even if the pandemic has caused them to lose their job.

    In the midst of a health crisis, Dreamers now face a mounting financial crisis with almost no access to the government benefits many of their neighbors enjoy — despite the fact that DACA and eligible immigrants pay approximately $2 billion a year in state and local taxes. As they have made myriad contributions to American society, it’s time for society to help Dreamers in return by providing them with the care and financial assistance they deserve.

    Below, you’ll find answers to your most important questions as well as a long list of financial resources that can help.

    LIST OF NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

    DACA during COVID-19

    The Center for American Progress says the largest occupation groups for DACA recipients are food preparation and office administration support. Significant portions of Dreamers work in sales, education, the nonprofit sector and in the medical field, meaning that many are essential workers.

    The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services are still accepting requests from DACA recipients to renew their status during COVID-19, but because of a preliminary injunction in 2018, they are not accepting requests from individuals who haven’t previously been granted DACA status. There is still the possibility that the U.S. Supreme Court could rule to allow the program to end DACA during the pandemic. This would not only put the lives of Dreamers at risk, but it could also put some 27,000 medical professionals fighting on the front lines of this crisis out of work.

    It’s understandable to be fearful or confused about what this means for your status and your ability to obtain services. Here are answers to some of the most pressing questions you may have during this time.

    Are DACA recipients getting the proper care they need — especially if they’re sick?

    DACA recipients are particularly vulnerable during the pandemic because they already face enormous hurdles in acquiring services. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, about 39% of individuals with DACA status are uninsured. They don’t have access to financial assistance through Medicaid or the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Marketplaces, either.

    But DACA recipients won’t be turned away from medical facilities. The National Immigration Law Center says, “Immigrants can continue to access services at community health centers, regardless of their immigration status, and at a reduced cost or free of charge depending on their income.” Additionally, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act provides funding to pay for COVID-19 testing at community health centers, outpatient clinics and doctors’ offices, even for people who are uninsured.

    Are immigration offices closing down?

    Several U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services (USCIS) offices are closing down due to the pandemic. The USCIS is only providing emergency services for a limited number of situations. Anyone who had a previous appointment or ceremony will receive a notice by mail, and they will receive an additional notice for when the event is rescheduled.

    How are DACA recipients and undocumented immigrants’ jobs and classes affected with everything closing?

    Dreamers will be one of the hardest hit groups as schools and businesses shut down. Many DACA recipients occupy roles in food service — an industry that is already facing massive layoffs. More than 10 million people applied for unemployment benefits in the last two weeks of March, 2020. But, in addition to the other difficulties mentioned, DACA recipients can’t qualify for federal unemployment benefits.

    Immigrants can still renew a work permit, DACA status or temporary protected status (TPS) through the USCIS. Although many offices are closed, the USCIS announced it would allow electronic or photocopied signatures on the I-129 form, which is necessary for work authorization.

    Many colleges are closing their campuses due to the pandemic and moving classes online. As such, DACA recipients who are in college should be able to continue attending class online. However, some DACA recipients may face another threat due to school closures: food and housing insecurity. Additionally, they could also struggle to attend class if they don’t have access to a reliable internet connection.

    Does the stimulus package include undocumented immigrants?

    Many DACA recipients are on the front lines in the medical and first responder community during this pandemic. And yet, the $2.2 trillion CARES Act passed by Congress provides no aid to undocumented immigrants, including DACA recipients. To receive assistance, DACA recipients must turn to non-governmental organizations (NGOs), state governments, private institutions and other cooperative groups for help.

    DACA recipients may be hesitant to search for government assistance, especially in light of the new “Public Charge” regulation, which deems some immigrants “inadmissible” if the government determines they cannot support themselves financially.

    According to Renata Castro Esq., an immigration attorney and Founder of Castro Legal Group in Pompano Beach, Florida, “DACA applicants shall be rather careful in seeking financial help, in light of the Public Charge rule implemented by the Trump administration.”

    That said, Castro also insists that DACA recipients still have certain rights under the law: “DACA recipients have full rights to any employment law-related remedy irrespective of their legal status, such as wrongful termination. I have also taken the position that it is safe to collect unemployment benefits where available. Assistance from private companies offering relief does not impact the Public Charge analysis in a future petition.”

    J.J. Despain, Managing Attorney at Wilner & O’Reilly Immigration Attorneys in Boise, Idaho also believes most DACA recipients are safe to pursue at least some relief benefits in light of COVID-19. “There are certain public benefits that DACA recipients won’t qualify for because they do not have permanent residency or U.S. citizenship. However, they won’t get in trouble for asking [about] these benefits, as long as they are truthful about their immigration status,” he says. “A person’s qualifying for DACA and a work permit is not dependent on whether that person is or is not getting financial assistance.”

    Despain also notes that “the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services has come out to say that if COVID-19 is what spurred the need to apply for public benefits, those public benefits will not count against that future permanent resident.” In other words, DACA recipients who apply for public benefits due to a loss from COVID-19 won’t likely be putting their immigration status at risk as long as they are honest in their application. Nonetheless, Despain suggests most DACA recipients speak with an immigration attorney before attempting to claim benefits.

    If you are experiencing feelings of stress or fear while searching for financial assistance, know that there are advocates out there, including attorneys, advocates, and volunteers.

    Financial assistance for DACA recipients

    There are multiple ways DACA recipients can receive financial assistance during times of economic hardship. Here are just a few of the approaches that can help. Below, we’ve also included an extensive list of organizations that can provide assistance to DACA recipients during this crisis.

    Personal loans

    One option to help make ends meet is to apply for a personal loan. You can also use a personal loan to pay for DACA renewal fees if you don’t have cash on hand to pay them immediately. The cost of renewing/applying for DACA is $495, so you could cover the cost with a relatively small personal loan.

    There are pros and cons to this approach, however. 

    The biggest benefit to a personal loan is that the funds could be made available immediately if you qualify. You can also use a personal loan for almost anything, whether it’s food, bills or transportation. They’re available from a variety of lenders, including credit unions, banks and online lenders.

    On the other hand, taking on a personal loan means taking on debt. If you’ve lost your income and don’t know when you’ll get it back, you could run into trouble when it comes time to start making repayments on your loan. Personal loans also come with higher rates than some other types of loans, so you’ll end up paying more in the long run. You may also need to pay origination fees, and you’ll need to make fixed payments at regular intervals to avoid late payment fees.

    Credit unions have a long history of empowering immigrants by providing broader financial access to communities that need it. They are non-profit organizations that work to serve their members, not generate profit at all costs. Credit unions are more likely to accept alternative forms of ID, and they may even provide specific loans for DACA recipients and under-banked individuals struggling during the pandemic.

    Finally, you could take out a personal loan through an online lender. Many online lenders are startups that were created specifically to serve underbanked populations. They are more likely to use factors other than your credit score to determine your creditworthiness. If you go this route, just be sure to understand the online lender’s rates and repayment terms before agreeing to the loan.

    Credit cards

    Credit cards are another option for covering expenses in the interim, although they also come with advantages and disadvantages.

    Unlike a personal loan, you can make minimum payments on your credit card each month if you need to. Your debt will accrue more interest this way, but you’ll have more opportunities to purchase the things you need and save your cash during the pandemic. You can also use a credit card to build credit, and you may not need to link it to a checking or savings account.

    However, similar to a personal loan, you’ll end up paying interest by using a credit card, and you’ll have to pay a fee if you’re late on your monthly payment. Credit cards are also notoriously easy to use. If you spend too much and fail to make payments, you could ruin your credit score and rack up a significant amount of debt.

    Unlike the cash you get from a personal loan, credit cards can’t be used for every expense, either. Most landlords won’t accept rent payments on a credit card, and you can’t pay most bills with a credit card.

    Nonprofit organizations

    Although the offices of many nonprofit organizations are closed due to COVID-19, many are still providing remote services. While few nonprofit groups are providing direct assistance to immigrants through cash funds, most are providing food, housing assistance, utility assistance, and even childcare services. You can also access legal assistance and loans to pay for DACA renewal fees from some NGOs.

    Unlike banks and even credit unions, most NGOs offer assistance with no strings attached. Their purpose is to offer that assistance, not make a profit. However, most nonprofits can only perform limited functions to maintain their tax-exempt status, and few of them provide direct financial assistance without offering a loan.

    The availability of help from nonprofits may also depend on where you live. Most nonprofits keep their offices in larger towns and cities. You may not be able to access their in-person services if you live far away, even if they are available during the pandemic.

    State benefits and services

    Aside from work authorization, DACA recipients cannot receive any benefits from the federal government. This includes benefits provided by the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, sometimes referred to as “food stamps”) and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). Any Dreamer who wants to obtain financial assistance from a government body must turn to the state in which they live, or even the county or city.

    Unfortunately, laws regarding benefits for DACA recipients vary state by state. However, according to Jon Velie, Lead Attorney for Velie Law firm and CEO of OnlineVISAs.com, “Those recipients who live within the states of California, Colorado, New York, and Texas are eligible for unemployment benefits. These benefits will not be counted against you based on the new Public Charge regulation. Recipients should check their state’s website to determine if they qualify.”

    Your state may have other programs that help Dreamers when they are facing financial hardship. Check your state’s website for a list of available resources to address the pandemic or browse state benefits at Benefits.gov. We’ve also included a long list of resources below, including non-profits, credit unions and NGOs, which are organized by state.

    Grassroots funds

    Grassroots funds are often crowdsourced from willing donors. They may be linked to an association or a nonprofit, but they could also be established by a loosely-organized collective within a community.

    Grassroots funds usually provide direct assistance in the form of cash, food, clothing or household supplies. Help is often available upon request, and there usually isn’t much red tape to get assistance.

    Keep in mind that Grassroots funds that aren’t attached to an association or nonprofit may not be organized very effectively, so they may also be unreliable. The organizers may not be able to guarantee assistance to everyone who applies, and any cash assistance you receive may be small and may not be enough to cover all your bills.

    The availability of grassroots funding may also depend on where you live. If you have an extensive network of friends and family who may be able to help, you could also consider starting your own funding campaign through crowdsourcing sites like GoFundMe.

    Organizations that can help

    Below, you’ll find an extensive list of organizations that can help DACA recipients during the coronavirus pandemic. These organizations range from credit unions and non-profits to commercial lenders and faith-based groups, and they provide a range of services including food assistance, COVID relief funds assistance, mortgage refinancing support, and others.

    Note that there could be some disruptions to services due to the pandemic. However, most organizations are still serving their communities remotely.

    National organizations

    Name of OrganizationServicesContact InformationAvailability During Pandemic
    StiltOnline personal loans for immigrants and individuals in underserved communities.Phone: 415-630-2323
    Address: 404 Bryant St, San Francisco, CA 94107 
    Email: Team@stilt.com 
    Available in: AZ, IL, FL, TX, PA, CA, MI, WA, UT, OH, GA, NY, NJ, WI, MA, VA.
    Boro (BoroCash)Online personal loans for international students on student visas, green card holders, and recent graduates.Phone: 800-840-6604 
    Address: None Listed 
    Email: info@getboro.com 
    Available in: AR, CA, FL, IL, IA, MI, NE, NJ, NY, NC, OH, PA, UT, WA, WI.
    UndocuScholars Relief FundEmergency support for undocumented students and scholars.Phone: 360-524-3664 Address: Seattle, WA and Vancouver, WA 
    Email: Website Form 
    Available.
    Restaurant Workers’ Community FoundationEmergency assistance for individuals employed by restaurants, bars, or restaurant suppliers.Phone: None Listed 
    Address: None Listed 
    Email: info@restaurantworkerscf.org 
    Available.
    One Fair Wage Emergency Fund Emergency assistance for restaurant workers, delivery workers, drivers, and personal service workers.Phone: None Listed
    Address: None Listed 
    Email: info@n-lan.org 
    Awaiting Funds
    Mission Asset FundImmigration loans, lending circles, business loans.Phone: 888-274-4808 Address: 3269 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94110 
    Email: info@n-lan.org or Website Form 
    Available.

    State organizations

    Alabama
    Alaska
    Arizona
    Arkansas
    California
    Colorado
    Connecticut
    Delaware
    Florida
    Georgia
    Hawaii
    Idaho
    Illinois
    Indiana
    Iowa
    Kansas
    Kentucky
    Louisiana
    Maine
    Maryland
    Massachusetts
    Michigan
    Minnesota
    Mississippi
    Missouri
    Montana
    Nebraska
    Nevada
    New Hampshire
    New Jersey
    New Mexico
    New York
    North Carolina
    North Dakota
    Ohio
    Oklahoma
    Oregon
    Pennsylvania
    Rhode Island
    South Carolina
    South Dakota
    Tennessee
    Texas
    Utah
    Vermont
    Virginia
    Washington
    Washington D.C.
    West Virginia
    Wisconsin
    Wyoming
    Name of OrganizationServicesContact InformationAvailability During Pandemic
    Alabama
    Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama (HICA)Financial coaching, tax assistance, business micro-lending.Phone: 205-942-5505 or 866-502-4422 
    Address: 117 Southcrest Drive, Birmingham, AL 35209 
    Email: None Listed 
    Open, but not for in-person visits.
    Hope Credit UnionPersonal loans, ITIN loans, home equity loans, signature loans.Phone: 866-321-4673
    Address: 400 Arba Street, Montgomery, AL 36104 
    Email: info@hopecu.org 
    Temporary closures and limited lobby access.
    Alaska
    Alaska Immigration Justice ProjectLegal assistance.Phone: 877-273-2457 
    Address: 431 West 7th Ave. Suite 208, Anchorage, AK 99501 
    Email: contactaij@akijp.org 
    Open.
    Catholic Social ServicesHomeless family services, hunger relief, immigration services.Phone: 907-222-7300 
    Address: 3710 E. 20th Avenue, Anchorage, Alaska 99508 
    Email: info@cssalaska.org 
    Open.
    Arizona
    Vantage West Credit UnionPersonal loans, share-secured loans, debt consolidation loans, low-interest payday loans, COVID-19 loan relief assistance.Phone: 800-888-7882 
    Address: P.O. Box 15115, Tucson, AZ 85708 
    Email: Website Form 
    Drive-thru services only. Lobby services are available by appointment only.
    Promise ArizonaDACA renewal assistance.Phone: None Listed 
    Address: 6437 S Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85042 
    Email: Lorem 
    Open.
    Arkansas
    Hope Credit UnionPersonal loans, ITIN loans, home equity loans, signature loans.Phone: 866-321-4673 
    Address: 8411 I-30, Little Rock, AR 72209 
    Email: info@hopecu.org 
    Temporary closures and limited lobby access.
    Catholic Charities of Arkansas Immigration Services (Little Rock and Springdale)Petitions, counseling services, immigration application assistance.Phone: (501) 664-0340 
    Address: 2022 W. Sunset Ave., Springdale, AR 72762 and 
    Email: None Listed 
    Open. Services available by appointment only.
    California
    Santa Cruz Community Credit UnionDACA loans, home equity loans, personal loans, VISA credit cards.Phone: 831-425-7708 
    Address: 324 Front Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 
    Email: Website Form 
    Limited branch hours. Appointments available by phone.
    NorCal ResistEmergency cash assistance in the Sacramento area.Phone: 916-382-0256 
    Address: 2121 Broadway, Sacramento, CA 95818-8331 
    Email: NorCalResist@gmail.com or Use Website Form 
    Available.
    Colorado
    Denver Metro Emergency Food NetworkPrepared meals delivered to families and elderly individuals.Phone: 720-594-2065 (Text) 
    Address: None Listed 
    Email: Website Form 
    Available in the Denver Metro area.
    Fitzsimons Credit UnionPersonal loans, home equity loans, VISA credit cards, zero interest $700 “American Dream” loans, COVID-19 emergency loan assistance, loan payment deferrals.Phone: 303-340-3343 
    Address: 2201 N. Fitzsimons Parkway, Aurora, CO 80045 
    Email: info@FitzsimonsCU.com 
    Drive-thru services only. Lobby services are available by appointment only.
    Connecticut
    Members Credit UnionFinancial coaching, HELOCs, personal loans, citizenship loans, “quick” micro-loans, VISA credit cards.Phone: 203-622-6050
    Address: 126 East Putnam Ave. Cos Cob, CT 06807 
    Email: info@memberscu.coop 
    Drop-off and call-in services only.
    Connecticut Institute for Refugees and ImmigrantsLegal assistance, job placement, financial coaching.Phone: 203-336-0141 
    Address: Multiple Locations 
    Email: info@cirict.org
    Offices closed. Virtual and phone appointments available.
    Delaware
    Delaware Capital Good FundFinancial coaching, small personal loans, immigration loans.Phone: 866-584-3651 
    Address: 22 A Street, Providence, RI 02907 
    Email: loans@capitalgoodfund.org or financialcoaching@capitalgoodfund.org 
    Available statewide.
    La Esperanza CenterFinancial coaching, immigration services.Phone: 302-854-9262 
    Address: 216 N. Race Street, Georgetown, DE 19947 
    Email: info@laesperanza.org 
    No statement available on changes due to pandemic.
    Florida
    Florida Capital Good FundFinancial coaching, small personal loans, immigration loans.Phone: 866-584-3651 
    Address: 22 A Street, Providence, RI 02907 
    Email: loans@capitalgoodfund.org or financialcoaching@capitalgoodfund.org 
    Available statewide.
    Self-Help Federal Credit UnionHELOCs, personal loans, credit cards, immigration loans.Phone: 800-966-7353 
    Address: 667 W Orange Blossom Trail, Apopka, FL 32712 
    Email: info@self-helpfcu.org 
    Drive-thru services only.
    Georgia
    Latino Community Fund of GeorgiaScholarships, seed capital for micro-entrepreneurs, immigrant relief funds.Phone: 313-444-4761 
    Address: P.O. Box 3299, Decatur, GA 30031 
    Email: info@LCFGeorgia.org 
    Resources page available.
    Center for Pan Asian Community Services (CPAS)Housing services, financial coaching, tax assistance, homeless aid, low-income home energy assistance, food pantry.Phone: 770-936-0969 
    Address: 3510 Shallowford Rd. NE. Atlanta, GA 30341 
    Email: Website Form 
    No statement available on changes due to pandemic.
    Hawaii
    Hawaii Community Federal Credit UnionPersonal loans, HELOCs, VISA credit cards.Phone: 808-930-7700 
    Address: Multiple 
    Email: Website Form 
    Branch services available by appointment only.
    Catholic Charities of HawaiiDACA assistance, financial assistance, housing services, counseling services.Phone: 808-521-4357 
    Address: 1822 Ke‘eaumoku Street, Honolulu, HI 96822 
    Email: info@catholiccharitieshawaii.org 
    Services available by appointment only. Remote services available.
    Idaho
    Community Council of IdahoEmergency food boxes, employment training, affordable housing services, family clinic.Phone: 208-454-1652 
    Address: 317 Happy Day Blvd. Caldwell, ID 83607 
    Email: None Listed 
    Offices closed. Remote services available.
    Icon Credit UnionPersonal loans, VISA credit cards, financial counseling.Phone: 800-472-3272 
    Address: Multiple locations. 
    Email: Website Form 
    Drive-thru service only.
    Illinois
    Illinois Capital Good FundFinancial coaching, small personal loans, immigration loans.Phone: 866-584-3651 
    Address: 22 A Street, Providence, RI 02907 
    Email: loans@capitalgoodfund.org or financialcoaching@capitalgoodfund.org 
    Available statewide.
    Community HealthFree clinic for undocumented and uninsured individuals.Phone: 773-395-9900 
    Address: 2611 W. Chicago Ave, Chicago, IL 60622 
    Email: None Listed 
    Open.
    Indiana
    Undocumented Hoosier Support Fund (No Official Website)Financial support for single-parent families.Phone: 317-205-6424 or 574-226-3508 
    Address: Lorem 
    Email: undocuhoosierfund@gmail.com 
    Awaiting Funds.
    Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee RightsFamily support, healthcare access, public benefits access.Phone: 312-332-7360 
    Address: 228 S. Wabash, Suite 800, Chicago, Illinois 60604 
    Email: davelar@icirr.org (DACA) or info@icirr.org 
    Open.
    Iowa
    Ascentra Credit UnionImmigration services financing, personal loans, credit cards.Phone: 800-426-5241 
    Address: Multiple Locations 
    Email: Website Form 
    Drive-thru services. Lobby services are available by appointment only.
    American Friends Service CommitteeLegal and financial aid.Phone: 515-274-4851 
    Address: 4211 Grand Avenue, Des Moines, IA 50312 
    Email: afscdesm@afsc.org 
    Remote services available.
    Kansas
    El Centro de Servicios Para Hispanos of TopekaCommunity resources, mobile health clinic, DACA assistance.Phone: 785-232-8207 
    Address: 134 NE Lake Topeka, Kansas 66616 
    Email: None Listed 
    No statement available on changes due to pandemic.
    Catholic Charities of Northeast KansasFamily support, food assistance, financial coaching, immigration services.Phone: 913-433-2100 
    Address: 9720 W. 87th Street, Overland Park, KS 66212 
    Email: Website Form 
    Open.
    Kentucky
    Kentucky Refugee MinistriesEmployment assistance, DACA assistance, health and wellness services.Phone: 479-9180 
    Address: 969-B Cherokee Road, Louisville, Kentucky 40204 
    Email: Website Form 
    Some services suspended.
    The Louisville Housing Opportunities and Micro-Enterprise Community Development Loan Fund (LHOME)Lifeline personal loans, small business loans, COVID-19 response loans.Phone: 502-882-8091 
    Address: 1126 Berry Blvd Louisville, KY 40215 
    Email: info@lhomeky.org 
    Available.
    Louisiana
    Gulf Coast Center for Law & PolicyImmigration services, DACA assistance, other legal services.Phone: 985-643-6186 
    Address: P.O. Box 784, Slidell, LA 70459 
    Email: info@gcclp.org 
    No statement available on changes due to pandemic.
    Hospitality Cares Pandemic Response Fund (United Way of Southeast Louisiana)Crisis grants of up to $500. Phone: 985-778-0815 or 985-542-8680 
    Address: 2515 Canal Street, New Orleans, LA 70119 
    Email: Website Form 
    Available.
    Maine
    cPort Credit UnionFinancial coaching, citizenship loans, energy loans, HELOCs, personal loans, debt consolidation loans, credit cards.Phone: 800-464-0253 
    Address: 50 Riverside Industrial Parkway, Portland, ME 04103 
    Email: Website Form 
    Drive-thru services only.
    Catholic Charities of Maine (Portland Office)Behavioral health services, childcare services, food bank, immigration services.Phone: 207-781-8550 
    Address: P.O. Box 10660, Portland, Maine 04104-6060 
    Email: info@CCMaine.org 
    Open.
    Maryland
    Cash Campaign of MarylandFinancial coaching, benefits screening, tax preparation services.Phone: 410-528-8006 
    Address: 575 S. Charles Street, Suite 500, Baltimore MD 21201 
    Email: info@cashmd.org 
    Remote services available.
    Chesapeake Multicultural Resource CenterEmployment assistance, financial assistance, food assistance, legal services, tax services.Phone: 443-786-1120 or Matthew Peters – 410-924-4022; Estela Ramirez – 443-333-7683; Victoria Gomez – 410-310-6444 
    Address: 331 E. Dover Street, Easton, MD 2160 
    Email: info@chesmrc.org or Website Form 
    Staff available by phone or email. Resource center closed.
    Massachusetts
    Massachusetts Capital Good FundFinancial coaching, small personal loans, immigration loans.Phone: 866-584-3651 
    Address: 22 A Street, Providence, RI 02907 
    Email: loans@capitalgoodfund.org or financialcoaching@capitalgoodfund.org 
    Available statewide.
    MassUndocuFundEmergency relief funds.Phone: None Listed 
    Address: 375 Centre Street, Boston, MA 02130 
    Email: MassUndocuFund@massjwj.net 
    Awaiting funds.
    Michigan
    Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS)Employment services, immigration services, financial coaching, income benefits.Phone: 313-842-7010 
    Address: 2651 Saulino Court, Dearborn, MI 48120 
    Email: None Listed 
    Remote services available.
    Community Promise Federal Credit UnionPayday alternative loans, unsecured emergency loans, short term loans, share-secured loans, signature loans.Phone: 269-459-1777 
    Address: 1313 Portage Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49001 
    Email: Website Form 
    Temporary closures and limited lobby access.
    Minnesota
    Immigrant Hope (Bloomington, Minnesota)Immigration services, legal assistance, benefits assistance, faith-based services.Phone: 952-564-3767 
    Address: 2300 E. 88th Street, Bloomington, MN 55425 
    Email: Website Form 
    No statement available on changes due to pandemic.
    HOME LineFree legal help for renters.Phone: 612-728-5767 or 612-255-8870 (En Español) 
    Address: 8011 34th Ave. S., Suite #126, Bloomington, MN 55425 
    Email: None Listed 
    Offices closed. Remote services available.
    Mississippi
    El PuebloAffordable care assistance, legal services.Phone: 228-436-3986 
    Address: 425B Division St., Biloxi, MS 39530 
    Email: info@elpueblo-ms.org 
    No statement available on changes due to pandemic.
    Catholic Charities Diocese of JacksonImmigrant assistance.Phone: 601-355-8634 
    Address: 850 E River Place Ste 300 Suite 300, Jackson, MS 39202 
    Email: Website Form 
    No statement available on changes due to pandemic.
    Missouri
    Holy Rosary Credit UnionFinancial coaching, personal loans, personal lines of credit, VISA credit cards.Phone: 816-221-2734 
    Address: Multiple Locations 
    Email: Website Form 
    Limited lobby access.
    St. Francis Community ServicesLegal assistance, disaster recovery, health clinic.Phone: 314-932-3300 
    Address: 4445 Lindell Blvd. St. Louis MO, 63108 
    Email: SFCS@ccstl.org 
    Remote services available. No walk-in appointments or meetings.
    Montana
    HavenDomestic violence shelter, counseling and support groups.Phone: 406-586-7689 
    Address: P.O. Box 752, Bozeman, MT 59771 
    Email: None Listed 
    No statement available on changes due to pandemic.
    Soft Landing MissoulaImmigrant and refugee resettlement assistance, food pantry, community services assistance.Phone: 406-493-0504 
    Address: 939 Stephens Avenue, Suite C, Missoula, Montana 59801 
    Email: info@softlandingmissoula.org or Website Form 
    Remote services available. No walk-in appointments or meetings.
    Nebraska
    Catholic Social Services of Southern NebraskaFood assistance, counseling services, legal services.Phone: 402-474-1600 or 800-981-8242 
    Address: St. Joseph Center, 2241 O Street, Lincoln, NE 68510 
    Email: Website Form 
    Limited access to some services.
    Catholic Charities of OmahaEmergency food services, immigration services.Phone: 402-554-0520 
    Address: 3300 N 60th Street, Omaha, NE 68104 
    Email: catholiccharities@ccomaha.org 
    Limited access to some services.
    Nevada
    SCE Federal Credit Union Personal loans, VISA credit cards,Phone: 800-866-6474 
    Address: Multiple Locations 
    Email: Website Form 
    Limited lobby access.
    Catholic Charities of Northern NevadaFood pantry, immigration services.Phone: 775-322-7073 
    Address: 500 E. Fourth Street, Reno, NV 89512 
    Email: immigration@ccsnn.org 
    Immigration services available by appointment only. Limited access to walk-in services.
    New Hampshire
    New Hampshire Federal Credit UnionPersonal loans, emergency COVID-19 loans, financial coaching.Phone: 603-224-7731 
    Address: 47 N. Main Street, Concord, NH 03301 
    Email: Website Form 
    Drive-thru and curbside service only.
    Catholic Charities of New HampshireLegal services, food bank, counseling services.Phone: 800-562-5249 
    Address: 215 Myrtle Street, Manchester, NH 03104-4354 
    Email: Website Form 
    No statement available on changes due to pandemic.
    New Jersey
    North Jersey Federal Credit UnionHome equity loans, HELOCs, personal loans, credit cards.Phone: 973-785-9200 
    Address: 711 Union Blvd. Totowa, New Jersey 07512 
    Email: info@njfcu.org 
    Lobby services are available by appointment only.
    El Centro HIspanoamericanoDACA assistance, immigration services, social services assistance.Phone: 908-753-8730 
    Address: 525 East Front Street, Plainfield, NJ 07060 
    Email: info@elcentronj.org or Website Form 
    Remote services available. Limited access to some services.
    New Mexico
    Guadalupe Credit UnionSignature loans, share-secured loans, HELOCs, VISA credit cards.Phone: 800-540-5382 
    Address: 3601 Mimbres Lane, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87507 
    Email: Website Form 
    Limited lobby access at some locations. Lobby services available by appointment only at some locations.
    Rio Grande Credit UnionFree financial coaching, 0.00% APR Relief Loan.Phone: 505-265-4926 or 877-742-8505 (toll-free) 
    Address: 1211 4th Street NW, Albuquerque, NM 87102 
    Email: None Listed 
    Drive-thru services only. 
    New York
    Lower East Side People’s Federal Credit UnionWire transfer services, ITIN application services, personal loans, credit cards.Phone: 212-529-8197 
    Address: Multiple Locations 
    Email: lespfcu@lespfcu.org 
    Limited lobby access.
    Raise Undocu Workers FundEmergency financial assistance for food service workers.Phone: None Listed 
    Address: None Listed 
    Email: Website Form 
    Available.  
    North Carolina
    Latino Community Credit UnionDreamer loans, immigration services loans, personal loans, secured loans, credit cards, wire transfer services.Phone: 919-595-1800 
    Address: P.O. Box 25360, Durham NC, 27702 
    Email: None Listed 
    Limited lobby access.
    Catholic Charities of RaleighCounseling, disaster service, food pantry, senior pharmacy program, immigration services.Phone: 919-821-9750 
    Address: 7200 Stonehenge Drive, Raleigh, NC 27613 
    Email: None Listed 
    Limited access to some services.
    North Dakota
    Lutheran Social Services of North DakotaCounseling services, affordable housing services, humanitarian aid.Phone: 701-235-7341 
    Address: Multiple Locations 
    Email: Website Form 
    Offices closed. Remote services available.
    Catholic Charities of North DakotaCounseling, disaster response.Phone: 701-235-4457 
    Address: Multiple Locations 
    Email: Website Form 
    Offices closed. Meetings available by appointment.
    Ohio
    Nueva Esperanza Community Credit Union (No Official Website)Participation loans, financial coaching.Phone: 419-720-9530 
    Address: 1638 Broadway Street, Toledo, OH 43609 
    Email: None Listed 
    No statement available on changes due to pandemic.
    Hebrew Free Loan AssociationInterest-free Coronavirus loans.Phone: 216-378-9042 
    Address: 23300 Chagrin Boulevard, Suite 204, Beachwood, OH 44122 
    Email: michal@interestfree.org 
    Available.
    Oklahoma
    American Dream CenterImmigration services, employment assistance.Phone: 918-609-3247 
    Address: 13111 E. 21st Street, Tulsa, OK 74134 
    Email: americandreamcenter@gmail.com or Website Form 
    No statement available on changes due to pandemic.
    Catholic Charities of Oklahoma CityImmigration services, housing services, social services assistance.Phone: 405-523-3000 
    Address: 1232 N. Classen Blvd. Oklahoma City, OK 73106 
    Email: None Listed 
    Limited access to some services.
    Oregon
    Point West Credit UnionPersonal loans, debt consolidation loans, financial coaching, VISA credit cards.Phone: 503-546-5000 or 888-468-5826 
    Address: 1107 NE 9th Ave, Suite 108, Portland, Oregon 97232 
    Email: Website Form 
    Limited lobby access.
    Portland Coronavirus Mutual Aid FundFood and supply assistance.Phone: None Listed 
    Address: None Listed 
    Email: Website Form 
    Cannot guarantee a response to all requests.
    Pennsylvania
    HIAS PennsylvaniaCoronavirus relief, DACA services, immigration services.Phone: 215-832-0900 
    Address: 2100 Arch Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103-1300 
    Email: Website Form 
    In-person meetings suspended. Remote services available.
    Catholic Social Services Archdiocese of PhiladelphiaHousing services, emergency food services, immigration services.Phone: 267-331-2490 
    Address: 222 North 17th Street, 3rd Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19103 
    Email: csshelp@chs-adphila.org 
    In-person meetings suspended. Remote services available.
    Rhode Island
    Rhode Island Capital Good FundFinancial coaching, small personal loans, immigration loans.Phone: 866-584-3651 
    Address: 22 A Street, Providence, RI 02907 
    Email: loans@capitalgoodfund.org or financialcoaching@capitalgoodfund.org 
    Available statewide.
    Dorcas International Institute of Rhode IslandImmigration services, employment services.Phone: 401-784-8600 
    Address: 220 Elmwood Avenue, Providence, RI 02907-1435 
    Email: info@diiri.org 
    In-person meetings suspended. Remote services available.
    South Carolina
    Trident United WayBasic financial needs, tax filing services, community services assistance, Tri-County COVID-19 Response Fund.Phone: 843-740-9000 
    Address: 6296 Rivers Avenue, Suite 200, North Charleston, SC 29406 
    Email: receptionist@tuw.org 
    Open.
    Founders Federal Credit UnionPersonal loans, personal lines of credit.Phone: 800-845-1614 
    Address: Multiple Locations 
    Email: Website Form 
    Drive-thru services only. 
    South Dakota
    LSS-SD Center for New AmericansDisaster response, financial coaching, housing assistance.Phone: 605-444-7500 or 800-568-2401 
    Address: 705 East 41st Street, Suite 200, Sioux Falls, SD 57105 
    Email: info@lsssd.org 
    Remote services available.
    Highmark Credit UnionCOVID-19 relief loans.Phone: 800-672-6365 
    Address: Multiple Locations 
    Email: Website Form 
    Drive-thru services only. 
    Tennessee
    Hope Credit UnionPersonal loans, ITIN loans, home equity loans, signature loans.Phone: 866-321-4673 
    Address: Multiple Locations 
    Email: info@hopecu.org 
    Temporary closures and limited lobby access.
    Mid-South Food BankFood assistance.Phone: 901-527-0841 
    Address: 3865 S. Perkins Rd., Memphis, TN 38118 
    Email: None Listed 
    Mobile food distributions.
    Texas
    Randolph-Brooks Federal Credit UnionPersonal loans, credit cards.Phone: 210-945-3300 (San Antonio), 512-833-3300 (Austin), or 800-580-3300 
    Address: Multiple Locations 
    Email: memberservices@rbfcu.org 
    Drive-thru services only.
    Casa MarianellaLegal services, housing services, benefits assistance.Phone: 512-385-5571 
    Address: 821 Gunter Street, Austin, TX 78702 
    Email: posadaesperanza@casamarianella.org or Website Form 
    No statement available on changes due to pandemic.
    Utah
    Communities United  Emergency kits, financial coaching, employment assistance, immigration services.Phone: 801-487-4143 
    Address: 1750 W Research Way, West Valley City, Utah, 84119 
    Email: Website Form 
    Offices closed. Remote services available.
    City Center Credit UnionPersonal loans, shared secured loans.Phone: 801-374-5856 
    Address: 345 West 100 South, Provo, UT 84604 
    Email: Website Form 
    Limited lobby access.
    Vermont
    Opportunities Credit UnionCOVID-19 emergency loans, personal loans, financial coaching.Phone: 802-654-4551 or 800-865-8328 
    Address: 92 North Avenue, Burlington, VT 
    Email: Website Form 
    Temporary closures and reduced hours.
    Vermont Law School South Royalton Legal ClinicLegal assistance, immigration services, DACA assistance.Phone: 802-831-1500 
    Address: 164 Chelsea St, South Royalton, VT 05068 
    Email: smee@vermontlaw.edu 
    Offices closed. Remote services may be available.
    Virginia
    Northern Virginia Family ServiceEmergency financial assistance, immigration services.Phone: 571-748-2500 
    Address: 10455 White Granite Dr. Suite 100, Oakton, VA 22124 
    Email: info@nvfs.org or Fill Out Application Form for Assistance 
    Offices closed. Remote services available.
    NewBridges Immigrant Resource CenterLegal assistance, immigration services, financial coaching, tax assistance.Phone: 540-438-8295 
    Address: 64 West Water Street, Harrisonburg, VA 22801 
    Email: info@newbridgesirc.org 
    In-person meetings by appointment only.
    Washington
    Lower Valley Credit UnionCitizenship loans, VISA credit cards, wire transfer services.Phone: 877-406-5828 
    Address: Multiple Locations 
    Email: Website Form 
    Drive-thru services only.
    Scholarship Junkies COVID-19 Relief FundCOVID-19 relief funds.Phone: None Listed 
    Address: None Listed 
    Email: Waiting List Website Form 
    Available.
    Washington D.C.
    DC Credit UnionPersonal loans, New Americans loan program, credit cards, tax preparation services.Phone: 877-784-5551 
    Address: Reeves Center, 2000 14th Street NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20009 
    Email: Website Form 
    Temporary closures. Some suspended services.
    Central American Resource Center (CARECEN)Legal services, immigration services, housing assistance.Phone: 202-328-9799 
    Address: 1460 Columbia Road NW, Suite C-1, Washington, DC 20009 
    Email: info@carecendc.org 
    Offices closed. Remote services available.
    West Virginia
    Catholic Charities of West VirginiaFood assistance, tax assistance, immigration services.Phone: 888-900-2989 
    Address: 2000 Main St. Wheeling, WV 26003 
    Email: information@ccwva.org or Website Form 
    Open. Some program modifications. Remote services available.
    West Virginia University College of Law Immigration ClinicLegal services, immigration services.Phone: 304-293-7249 
    Address: 101 Law Center Drive, Post Office Box 6130, Morgantown, WV 26506-6130 
    Email: cliniclaw@mail.wvu.edu 
    Offices closed. Remote services may be available.
    Wisconsin
    Marine Credit UnionFinancial coaching, personal loans, debt consolidation, mortgage refinancing.Phone: 800-923-7280 
    Address: P.O. Box 309, Onalaska, WI 54650 
    Email: Website Form 
    Temporary closures and drive-thru services only.
    Centro Hispano of Dane CountyCOVID-19 relief funds.Phone: 608-255-3018 
    Address: 810 West Badger Road, ​Madison, WI 53713 
    Email: reception@micentro.org or  Website Form 
    In-person meetings suspended.
    Wyoming
    Catholic Charities of WyomingMaternity assistance, counseling.Phone: 1-800-788-4606 
    Address: 507 E. 18th Street, Cheyenne, WY 82001 
    Email: None Listed 
    No statement available on changes due to pandemic.
    Immigrant Hope Wyoming/IdahoLegal services, immigration services, DACA assistance.Phone: 208-709-0131 
    Address: 90 W. Kelly Ave. Jackson, WY 83001 
    Email: wyomingidaho@immigranthope.org 
    No statement available on changes due to pandemic.

    Mutual aid networks

    If you need direct financial assistance, food assistance or supplies immediately and can’t find any resources in your area, you could search for a nearby mutual aid network.

    Mutual aid networks are decentralized, grass-roots cooperatives that provide direct assistance to local communities. They aren’t backed by any organization, however, so they can’t always guarantee they’ll fulfill a request for assistance. Many mutual aid networks are accepting requests for assistance online, using Google Forms.

    The bottom line

    There are nearly 800,000 Dreamers in the United States. They own businesses, make significant cultural contributions to our society and are essential employees working on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

    Although the federal government is providing DACA recipients with little support during this crisis, there are plenty of organizations out there that want to help. Nonprofits and charity organizations are still working hard to provide the most vulnerable among us with the basics they need to get by, and there are alternative ways to obtain funding and temporary assistance. 

    Michael Rand

    Personal Finance Contributor

    Michael Rand is a business and personal finance writer based in Beverly, Massachusetts. He holds a master’s degree in writing from Salem State University and spent years producing content for financial services clients as an agency writer. His work has been featured in publications like Interest.com, The Simple Dollar, and Monetize.info.