401(k) plan

A type of retirement savings plan maintained by an employer that allows employees to contribute pretax dollars through salary deferral. Many plans offer a variety of investment options, including stocks, bonds, short-term reserves, mutual funds and company stock, and employers often match a percentage of employee contributions. 401(k) savings grow tax-deferred until they’re withdrawn. If you withdraw 401(k) assets before age 59½, in most cases an additional 10 percent penalty tax will also apply. Source: Vanguard.com

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A Guide to IRA Contribution Limits

Savers under 50 will be allowed to invest no more than $5,500 in their traditional or Roth IRA. Those who are 50 and older can contribute up to $6,500. But some income limits for contributions did increase for the upcoming year.

Here’s the Average 401(k) Rate of Return (Plus Expenses)

Something like 5% or 6% a year is reasonable, and long-term returns from 10 big mutual funds often found in 401(k) retirement plans show you could make even more than that.

7 Ways to Measure Your Financial Success

Just as blood pressure and cholesterol are valuable measures of your physical well-being, we've come up with the critical numbers you need to track the state of your financial health.

When Should You Retire?

It's still one of the best ways to tell how much monthly income you can generate from your nest egg without having to worry about outliving your savings.

7 Steps To A Successful Roth 401(k)

Here's how to make all of the right decisions so that you'll save more, invest wisely and take full advantage of all the tax breaks to build your retirement nest egg.

5 Steps To A Successful IRA

The government created individual retirement accounts, or IRAs, to encourage people to save more for their retirement. IRA also provide tax benef…

Target Date Funds

Target-date funds are the best retirement fund investment for a majority of savers. They guarantee you'll have a well-diversified portfolio, with low fees and no work on your part. That lets you concentrate on finding more money to put in them.

When To Start Collecting Social Security

Is it smart to sign up for a check as soon as you turn 62, the youngest possible age? Or should you wait a few years, when you'll qualify for a bigger monthly payment? Here's how to decide what's right for you.