5 smart moves to get a better night's sleep

Set a sleep schedule

You process a lot of information throughout the day that can help or hinder your ability to unwind and shut off.

Deadline pressures or sick kids are unavoidable, but the stress associated with both can follow you to the bedroom.

Even happy occasions can leave you awake at night, out of sorts the next day and trying to make up the deficit by oversleeping on the weekend.

Dr. David Volpi, director of the New York-based sleep treatment center Eos Sleep, advises setting a sleep schedule. Get into the habit of going to bed and waking up at the same time each day, no matter what has happened throughout the day to throw off your ritual.

Setting a regular sleep-wake cycle will naturally help you achieve a faster, lasting sleep at night.

He also suggests limiting bedroom activity to sleep and sex.

Avoiding watching TV or using smartphones and tablet computers in bed since, Volpi says, “the blue, artificial light given off from (devices with screens) has a negative effect on how quickly you can fall asleep and stay asleep.”