Worst New Year's resolutions

Making a dramatic career change

In 2012, 44% of workers surveyed by consulting firm Right Management were unsatisfied with their jobs.

Changing careers could improve job satisfaction, but, "A major career shift might require specific education and training that could take longer than a year to complete," says DeAnne Pearson, a career coach and owner of Deliberate Careers in Austin, Texas.

In other words, making a resolution to go from flipping burgers at a fast-food restaurant to running the kitchen in a five-star restaurant in 2013 is unrealistic.

Smart solution: Work toward your goal.

Spend 2013 taking the steps on the path to a career change, even if it means you won't finish by year's end.

Call colleges to find out about the requirements for nursing school or start taking culinary school classes. Set up a separate savings account to help cover the cost of training and education, ask colleges about financial aid packages and research tuition reimbursement options through your current employer. Pearson also suggests determining your eligibility for financial assistance through the Workforce Reinvestment Act.