You'll have to spend like a princess to make Disney credit card worth it

Disney credit card

The Walt Disney Company and Chase have long been partners on a Visa credit card that offers 1% back in rewards points to be redeemed on all things Disney.

Now they’re offering the new Disney Premier Visa card, promising better rewards and a new redemption perk.

Premier cardholders double their "Disney Dream Reward Dollars" to 2%, earned at restaurants, grocery stores, gas stations and many Disney locations like the Disneyland and Disney World resorts, the Disney cruise line and Disney stores. (You earn 1% on everything else.)

As with the standard Disney Rewards Visa card, reward dollars can be redeemed toward Disney hotel stays, theme park tickets, cruises, movie tickets and Disney store merchandise.

But Premier cardholders can also redeem toward airline travel on any airline to any destination with no blackout dates. Simply buy airline tickets with your card, then pay yourself back by redeeming reward dollars for a one-for-one credit on your monthly statement.

If you want to put your Disney-themed trip on your card, there’s a 0% APR for six months on Disney cruises (where you’ll get $50 of onboard credit) and certain vacation packages. The APR for the rest of the year is 14.24%.

The catch: the annual fee of $49.

That’s a fee typical of credit cards offering higher reward rates.

To recoup that fee, you would have to spend at least $2,450 at the 2% rewards rate.

On the standard Disney Rewards Visa, which has no annual fee, you already would have earned $24.50 with its 1% rewards rate.

Other than the rewards rate and the airline travel perk, the two cards are virtually the same.

And if you were hoping for more select perks at the theme parks, forget it.

Premier cardholders get the same VIP treatment as standard cardholders when it comes to discounts and meet-and-greets with Mickey Mouse, the Seven Dwarfs and the rest of the Disney film characters.

This credit card is probably best for parents thinking of treating their kids to a trip to Disneyland or some other Disney-themed vacation.

It requires big spending on all things Disney to make it worthwhile.

Compare this deal with the credit card offers in our extensive database.

  • Gannon

    Really interesting article in the New York Times on how companies learn your habits. It says the "science of habit formation" has become a major research field not only at universities but in major corporations that want your business.